“No” Doesn’t Always Mean No

Strategies For Influencing Behavior And Winning Cooperation

About The Book About The Book

“No” Doesn’t Always Mean No:

Strategies for Influencing Behavior and Winning Cooperation

Author: Kene Erike

Description: More sales. Stronger relationships. More confidence.

Format: Buy the PDF, get three additional formats for

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Page Count: varies by device

File Size: 743 KB

 

 

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“I want to be confident.”

“I want to make more money.”

“I want to talk to her, but I don’t know what to say.”

“Why don’t they respect me?”

More sales. Stronger relationships. More confidence.

We’ve all got hopes and needs.

Maybe it’s avoiding the regret of missed opportunities after not having the courage to talk to an attractive member of the opposite sex.

Or maybe you want to learn how to read body language, so you can tell whether she’s just being friendly or actually likes you, reducing the risk of potential embarrassment.

Maybe it’s creating business strategies that enhance client retention and generate sales—putting more money in your pocket.

It could be learning how to build stronger relationships with the people around—allowing you to be yourself and attract the people that like you for you.

For students, managers, and co-workers, it could be better brainstorming strategies for group project sessions that encourage everyone to contribute equally, instead of not pulling their weight and letting other group members—(read: you)—carry the load.

When you understand “why” people do what they do, success is that much easier.



“No” Doesn’t Always Mean No is a guide to understanding how everyday people think, act, and make decisions. You’ll learn strategies for growing a business, enhancing social intelligence, and boosting workplace performance.

Everybody likes confidence.

Good leaders ooze it and we all flock to it.

You can fake it for short periods of time, but that never lasts. You want confidence to be as natural as waking up in the morning—you don’t have to think about it; it just happens.

Confidence goes hand-in-hand with effective leadership. It isn’t “talking a good game” or being the loudest person in the room; introversion and confidence are not mutually-exclusive.

Confidence is the self-assurance that you’ve become someone that can be themselves and know that people will still be drawn to you. It’s a by-product of developing the skills and attributes that people want.

So, how do we build confidence?

We identify the skills most crucial to success for our goals and master them.

Mastery = higher self-esteem = more confidence.

For NFL Quarterbacks, coaches want players with the arm strength 
and accuracy to deliver passes while staring down a defense. Accordingly, prospective quarterbacks practice drills that develop these abilities.

It’s much easier to develop authentic confidence when you are armed with the
 right information.

“No” Doesn’t Always Mean No” provides the framework for building confidence at the office, the bar, and other venues where social skills are critical. You’ll learn how to overcome shyness and create your own solutions to problems with social interaction.

We sell every day.

When most people think of “sales”, they think of someone going to door-to-door selling steak knives or some huckster trying to recruit people into a pyramid scheme.

“Sales” is much broader than that.

Sales is encouraging others to accept an idea.

“Sales” is……

    • a law office or advertising agency demonstrating their expertise to win new business.

 

    • growing church membership or fundraising for a non-profit.

 

    • a parent trying to get their kids to listen to them (and kids bargaining for later curfews and more freedom).

 

 

  • finding the love of your life and getting married.

Without sales, nothing gets done.

Life is a series of negotiations. We are always selling.

Sales is the lifeblood of everything we do. It’s how you make the money to give your family the life they deserve, find the careers you love (instead of jobs that just “pay the bills”), and convince people to work with and commit to you.

Let’s peek inside the report:

Whether you’re looking to make more money, meet and attract the right people, or lead a team, “No” Doesn’t Always Mean No will teach you how to do it better.

Don’t take my word for it
see what people are

saying about the report:

” ‘Sales’ means far more than actually selling goods or services; it means making your points with

people in life in general. This is a very well-written book. The phraseology is good and flowing, it makes its points well and

is a pleasure to read.”

Alan E. Kligerman, CEO, AkPharma Inc.

“The field of social psychology offers all sorts of useful information for managers, negotiators, parents, educators, and anyone (all of us, really) who deals with other people. Kene Erike has distilled quite a bit of this information in a clear and succinct summary that readers from many walks of life will find helpful-and enjoyable to boot.”

Thomas Gilovich, professor of psychology at Cornell University and co-author of Why Smart People Make Big Money Mistakes and How to Correct Them

“The information in this compelling book instantly helped me become more competitive in my sector.

Identifying and embracing emerging opportunities in the IT industry is the name of the game. The data in this book can be

applied across many industries; Kene clearly gets it.”

Antoine Sylvia, IT Architect, IBM

“With all the game-playing and misinformation surrounding the dating game, finding love is hard enough. I’ve been setting up singles for years and know what it takes to find—and keep—love in the 21st century. Communication and shared commitment between partners are the biggest keys to lasting relationships. Half the battle is identifying the people most interested in you; the other half, putting your best “relationship” foot forward. “‘No’ Doesn’t Always Mean No” provides great assistance on both fronts.

Kene’s book explores the business game as well.

 

As the principal and founder of my own matchmaking and professional development agency, I understand how difficult it is to establish—and grow—a business. Soft skills are critical if you want to get anywhere. “‘No’ Doesn’t Always Mean No” is a thought-provoking read, invaluable for sharpening the skills you already have and developing a few new ones.”

Paul Carrick Brunson, Matchmaker, Author of It’s Complicated: A Modern Guide to Finding and Keeping Love, and Oprah Winfrey Network Contributor

FAQ:

“‘No’ doesn’t always mean no? Is this book about forcing yourself on people?”

Nope. Not even close.

The title underscores the importance of persistence and creativity, finding a way to solve problems.

There’s a scientific basis for the phrase as well (which I explain in the book):

Decisions we make represent decisions in that moment in time—not forever.

We may change our mind when faced with new information or our preferences change. For example, maybe you hated orange juice with pulp when you were a kid, but now, you won’t touch a glass of OJ unless it’s got pulp in it.

In this sense, “no” really doesn’t always mean no.

A controversial book title captures attention as well, and that has some value.

 

“But Kene, why should I pay for this material? Can’t I just search the internet and get this for free?”

You make the purchase for the same reason people eat at restaurants instead of at home…

You want the joy of the experience without the hassle of doing the prep work yourself.

Smart people understand the importance of paying for value.

They understand that life is short and there’s an opportunity cost to frivolous activity: instead of doing what you love to do, you’re wasting hours on something else.

You’ve got one life to live. Why pinch pennies instead of finding more productive uses of your time?

You’ve probably already spent a ton of time searching the internet for solutions to your problems, wading through contradictory, useless information. How many hours are you willing to waste scanning the web? Isn’t your time worth more than that?

Even Al Gore knows how fruitless certain online searches can be.

And he invented the internet.

But hey! It’s free, right?

You get what you pay for.

Time is money.

You’re not just buying a book: You’re buying peace of mind and the freedom to do something else besides spinning your wheels on the internet.

And you can always shoot me an email if you have a question.

It’s a no-brainer.

Purchasing Options

1) Buy the paperback via Amazon.com.

Price: $18.95

Here’s the link: “No” Doesn’t Always Mean No on Amazon.com

**OR**

2) Purchase the digital version of the report

and receive ALL OF THE EXTRAS (see below). Delivered instantly via download.

Price: $18.95

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**OR**

3) Combo deal:

 

Get the paperback, digital report, and ALL OF THE EXTRAS

for only $24. FREE SHIPPING included. (save over 33%)

Price: $24

 

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When you purchase the digital report (.PDF), I will throw in three additional popular digital formats for FREE.

More formats = better readability and convenience.

You’ll receive four (4) different formats of the report:

.PDF: Computers, Apple

devices, some mobile

devices, some e-readers

.EPUB: Apple devices, e-

readers (Sony,

Nook, etc.), Blackberry, most mobile devices

.MOBI: Amazon Kindle

.PDB: Blackberry, PDAs

That’s four products for the price of one.

Instructions on how to read the report on an Apple iPad and

Kindle

are included as well.

***Bonus***
When you purchase the report, I’ll throw in a special bonus item absolutely

free

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With your purchase, you will receive:

    • Four versions of the report for viewing on different devices (.PDF, .EPUB, .MOBI, .PDB)
    • Instructions for reading the report on the Kindle and iPad
    • Bonus gift

 

Distilled from empirical evidence and featuring real-world applications,

“No” Doesn’t Always Mean No unveils the principles behind uncommon success.

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Copyright © {CopyrightYears} Kene Erike

Read The Reviews

Reviews and Feedback

” ‘Sales’ means far more than actually selling goods or services; it means making
your points with people in life in general. This is a very well-written book. The phraseology is good and flowing, it
makes its points well and is a pleasure to read.”


Alan E. Kligerman, CEO, AkPharma Inc. “The field of social psychology offers all sorts of useful information for
managers, negotiators, parents, educators, and anyone (all of us, really) who deals with other people.
Kene Erike has distilled quite a bit of this information in a clear and succinct summary that readers
from many walks of life will find helpful-and enjoyable to boot.”

Thomas Gilovich, professor of psychology at Cornell University and co-author of Why Smart
People Make Big Money Mistakes and How to Correct Them
“The information in this compelling book instantly helped me become more
competitive in my sector. Identifying and embracing emerging opportunities in the IT industry is the name of the game. The data in
this book can be

applied across many industries; Kene clearly gets it.”


Antoine Sylvia, IT Architect, IBM “With all the game-playing and misinformation surrounding the dating game, finding
love is hard enough. I’ve been setting up singles for years and know what it takes to find—and
keep—love in the 21st century. Communication and shared commitment between partners are the biggest
keys to lasting relationships. Half the battle is identifying the people most interested in you; the
other half, putting your best “relationship” foot forward. “‘No’ Doesn’t Always Mean No” provides great
assistance on both fronts.

Kene’s book explores the business game as well.

 

As the principal and founder of my own matchmaking and professional development agency, I understand how
difficult it is to establish—and grow—a business. Soft skills are critical if you want to get
anywhere. “‘No’ Doesn’t Always Mean No” is a thought-provoking read, invaluable for sharpening the
skills you already have and developing a few new ones.”

Paul Carrick Brunson, Matchmaker, Author of It’s Complicated: A Modern Guide to Finding and
Keeping Love
, and Oprah Winfrey Network Contributor
“If you look around, there are an abundance of resources that will offer to assist
in learning how to sell. Some are good; many however are not. There’s another one to add to the list
now: No Doesn’t Always Mean No by Kene Erike. Not only does he cover sales, but also
how to network, why finding a niche is the best business strategy, negotiating your offer, and how to
build client relationships from the beginning as well as laying the groundwork for future interactions
and business. I highly recommend it to anyone looking for help in growing their business or brushing up
on their sales skills.”

Chris Horner, Photographer, LensArtwork.com

  Click for full review “Kene Erike believes life is “a continuous series of negotiations and challenges.”
In this book he explains sixteen desires that motivate behavior, especially purchasing behavior. He also
deals with how to transform a negative response into a positive one. He goes into detail about the
psychology of spending and explains how to remember someone’s name easily. Then there is a section on
male and female body language. This book will work for you if you are trying to make a sale and will
also work for you if you want to ward off someone who is pushing a sale on you. This book gives
information on the psychology of a sale. I learned some valuable things and I think you will too.”

The Rebecca Review, Top 50
Reviewer on Amazon.com
“I found the book to be an excellent read! I learned so much about myself as a
consumer. The book inspired me to look into selling a product.”

Ada Anosike “This is a great book. It offers ways to view your situation and try to help move
your self to the next level. I recommend it to any one trying to look for their next step.”

Patrick Barnes, Veterinarian “A solid guide on how to influence human behavior; could be expanded into a
textbook.”

Marc Branche, Medical Student “”No doesn’t always mean no: strategies for influencing behavior and winning
cooperation” challenges its readers to view their businesses and personal interactions differently.
Erike applies social psychology to teach his readers to improve their lives in a number of areas
including :negotiation techniques, decreasing social anxieties, and conducting effective job interviews.
If your trying to improve your interpersonal skills try this book.”

C. Doris Okafor, Attorney “A great conveyance to assist anyone who requires some insight into themselves
and what’s the best to advance his influence, career choice, focus in exploring opportunities for career
choice et al.”

Helen Hazan-Cohen, LCSW “This book provides the reader with a lot interesting perspective
to how enhance communication and interaction with individuals, employees and businesses.
This book is extremely user friendly and provides great suggestions that you
would normally find in numerous sources but it is all condensed in this nicely packaged book. Must
read!!!!!!!!!.”

Kenneth Nwosu, Physical Therapist “The author’s stories and examples illustrate his points with such clarity that
once the points are observed they seem like common sense. The book has the three qualities
I look for in a book of its genre – 1. it is short, 2. it has a lot of good content, and, most
importantly, 3.
it is entertaining. I would recommend it.”

Dupe A. “I found the book to be well written, concise and extremely informative. The author
did an awesome job of laying out the directives in the book in an easy to follow format with headers and
bold print. The Practical Application section really drove in the points
that were being made and allowed readers to go thru a real life scenario in their head.
I am thankful for a book such as this.”

Ogo Anosike “The title of this description states exactly how I feel about this book.
This might be one of the best “Self-Help” books I’ve read (and I’ve read a lot of them). The concepts,
and explanations of the concepts, found within this book can and will be useful to ANYONE who reads and
applies them to their life.
Definitely one of the best books I owned, and incredibly easy to read. Well done Mr. Kene Erike!”

K. Clark “Here is what I liked about the book: it is applicable to most people’s lives – not
just the corporate environment. As a daycare provider, I have to sell myself to parents. As an
evangelist I have to sell the gospel to complete strangers, from all ages and backgrounds. The section
on remembering names is so true. I learned this years ago and still use the same simple methods today,
with the same successful results.”

K. Miller, Minister, Living Word Christian Center, Minnesota “Kene’s book takes a number of psychological issues that are well known to
experienced sales people, managers, and other leaders and distills them down so that the average person
can understand them. Understanding that No doesn’t necessarily mean No is a bit of cliche in American
culture, but Kene breaks down the truths behind the cliche. People don’t always know what they want.
Understanding this concept is key, and Kene’s book helps with that.”

 

Cory Huff, Consultant and Entrepreneur, TheAbundantArtist.com “Intending to only read a few pages of the report, I found I could not put it down.
After struggling for years with remembering names, I came across a passage in the report that illustrated the use of
devices and visual association to aid memory. I would highly recommend this report and many of the techniques therein.”

 

Uche O., Foreign Exchange Trader Introduction

Introduction

At its core, persuasion is about the nuances of human psychology. It’s an appreciation of the
common biases and cognitive processes present in the human psyche. The same psyche that determines our
everyday choices–choices that can make (or break) your business or
organization. This book is not just for sales professionals and businesspeople; it is a valuable addition to any
library. Life is a continuous series of negotiations and challenges. A basic understanding of the principles of influence is an asset that no one should be
without.

In this book, you will learn:

*The twelve desires that control how we think, act, and
make decisions
*Why “no” doesn’t always mean “no”
and how to overcome initial resistance
*How to make friends just by
“showing up”
*The formula for changing human
behavior
*The
fool
proof strategy charities use to solicit
donations (you can use it, too)
*The four biggest reasons you fail to make the
sale
*The single most important word for effective professional and social
networking
*How to generate business using Behavioral
Economics
*Three things you’re not doing that may cost you that dream
job

And much, much more.

 

Copyright (c) 2012 Kene Erike

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Author’s Note

Acknowledgements

Introduction

Section One: The Top Four Reasons You Fail to Get the Sale

Section Two: Seven Principles of Influence and the Formula for Changing Behavior

Section Three: Cognitive Functions of the Influence Process

Section Four: Intelligent Business Practices

Section Five: Managing Your Social Network

Section Six: More Strategies for Influencing People and Growing Your Business

Final Words

Sources and Further Reading

Index

Copyright (c) 2012 Kene Erike

About Me

My name is Kene.

(Pronounced “Kenny”-short for “Kenechukwu”, which means “Thank
God”.
) I’m an entrepreneur-among other things-specializing in helping people build businesses and develop
fulfilling relationships. I wrote a guide (“No” Doesn’t Always Mean No) to decoding human behavior, boosting
workplace performance, forging relationships, and formulating business strategy. You can find that guide on my
blog
 and Amazon.com.

A graduate of Cornell University, my interests include Social Psychology, Sports Performance, and beach volleyball.

Learn more about connecting with the people around you: http://eepurl.com/q-KKv

How this blog got started

Contact

 

E-mail: contact@justtaptheglass.com

Twitter: @KeneErike

Check out some of the other ways I can help you here:

keneerike.com/services

Visit The Blog

Special Report: Success in Social and Business Settings

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4 Steps to Hearing God’s Will For Your Life

Old Lessons are Allies for New Experiences

Why Artists are Best Served Creating LESS For The Public

The GIft of Mortality (and other post-New Year’s lessons)

On Prince, Chyna, Moral Cowardice, and The Importance of Being Earnest

Easter Eggs and The Hunt for Everyday Wisdom

How to Frustrate Your Customers: Adventures in Poor Customer Service

Floyd, Chauvin, and Race in America: Where Do We Go from Here?

On George Floyd, Donald Trump, and Social Progress

Freddie Gray, Dirty Cops, & The Problem With (Peaceful) Protests

Slacktivism: The Problem With Social Media Movements

Control Your Emotions and Control Your Reality

Culture: The Difference Between Winners and Losers

The Definition of Patriotism: Anthem Demonstrations and Protests in The NFL

HSBC Lacks Transparency: A Tale of Corporate Malfeasance

What We Learned From Mike Brown, Eric Garner, and Ferguson (Part 1)

What We Learned From Mike Brown, Eric Garner, and Ferguson (Part 2)

Five Courses Every Student Should Take in College

Teachers: Overpaid or Underpaid?

Election 2016: Clinton, Trump, and 3 Keys for Wading Through The Battle Royal

Lessons From Election 2016

Why We Stopped Listening: Three Reasons You Suck at Public Speaking

Mating Calls of The Irrational Sports Fan: NCAA Edition

Mizzou Football Protest: How Protest Movements Can Effect Change

“Not Impressed” By Jobs + Wozniak: Interview With A Founding Father of Computing

Three Freedoms We Should Be Fighting For

Underdogs in Education (Part 1): For-Profit Schools as a Case Study in Game Theory

How To Build A Great Fantasy Football Team

From “The Book of Bad Ideas”: NYC Moves To Ban Sugary Drinks

Parenting and The Dangers of The Self-Esteem Movement

Why Good People Stand By and Do Nothing: Bystander Non-Intervention

Black Lives Matter & Police Fatalities: A Struggle for Progress in an Imperfect World

The Obesity Epidemic and Why Most Public Health Initiatives Don’t Work

LeBron James: The Hero We Need (But Not The One We Deserve)

Why I Cut Derrick Rose: Lessons In Decision Making

You Reach, I Teach (Part 1): A Stolen Laptop Unearths An International Crime Ring

Preventing Identity Theft (Part 1)

Preventing Identity Theft (Part 2)

How Many Calories Do You Really Need?

No, Weightlifting Will Not Turn You into a Monster

Ace Your Job Interview and Land that Business Contract (Part 1)

Ace Your Job Interview and Land that Business Contract (Part 2)

Why You Shouldn’t Fret When The Rich Get Richer: The Fixed-Pie Fallacy

Mating Calls of The Irrational Sports Fan: Lebron Edition (Part 1)

Mating Calls of The Irrational Sports Fan: Lebron Edition (Part 2)

Mating Calls of The Irrational Sports Fan: NCAA Edition

Dealing With People Who Cut The Line

When It’s Best to Start Over

The Irony of Censoring Media: A Word on Videogame Bans

100-Percent Accountability: Implement It Immediately

Effective Negotiating

Stop Exposing Your Hole Cards: A Lesson in Negotiation

Forget What You Know About Cholesterol and Heart Disease

Don’t Be Afraid to Ask for What You Want

McDonald’s and The Fight For Higher Wages

In Defense of Wal-Mart

Guest Posts on Other Websites

N.Y. Times Covers My Latest Story: Kene Examines eBay’s Business Ethics (Part 1)

eBay Follies and Besting Corporate Goliaths (Part 2)

Artists are Best Served Creating LESS Artwork–Here’s Why

On Life and Football: An Interview with Kene and Referee Rant

Standing Your Ground: How To Win Arguments (Without Destroying Relationships)

Silence: Are You Getting Enough?

Can You Ever Be Too Careful?: The Case for Calculated Aggression

Smart Gift Givers Earn More Money and Enjoy Closer Relationships: Here’s How You Can Become One (without spending a penny)

Life Lessons From The Game of Monopoly

The (Wo)man in The Mirror: 5 Practices For Getting Out of Your Own Way

You Can’t Make Them Love You (Two-Part Article)

The Secret to Becoming a Great Leader

Honesty: The Superpower Hiding in Plain Sight

Boundaries Protect Goals and Relationships: 3 Tips For Getting Yours in Order

Blame Games: Balancing Personal Accountability and Team Performance

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