Thanksgiving and The War Against Animal Trafficking

Thanksgiving is here again and turkeys will be featured guests at many a gathering.

It’s a good time to delve into the business of animals.

Previous articles on the subject…

What Kentucky Fried Chicken Can Teach Us About Saving Wildlife:
http://justtaptheglass.com/post/28908008093/how-to-save-wildlife

The Price of Cheap Meat:
http://justtaptheglass.com/post/93404246964/price-of-cheap-meat

Note: This is not a pro-vegetarian/anti-meat-eater piece. Adequate protein consumption is the key to looking good and, no matter what you’ve been told, diets completely-free of animal products are sub-optimal.

I was reading a fantastic article on ape trafficking in The New York Times earlier this month and it lent an excuse to explore this subject.

An excerpt from that New York.Times Piece:

Daniel Stiles, a self-styled ape trafficking detective in Kenya, had been scouring Instagram, Facebook and WhatsApp for weeks, looking for pictures of gorillas,chimps or orangutans. He was hoping to chip away at an illicit global trade that has captured or killed tens of thousands of apes and pushed some endangered species to the brink of extinction.

“The way they do business,” he said of ape traffickers, “makes the Mafia look like amateurs.”

Full article:

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/04/world/africa/ape-trafficking-bonobos-orangutans.html

Animals are featured attractions at zoos and circuses, so those businesses are stakeholders in trafficking policy. Some of their animals are born in captivity, but there are enough cubs, cats, and chicks snatched from the bush to concern anyone with a conscience.

I won’t malign all zoos—many are allies in the fight against extinction and play supporting roles in the preservation of many endangered species—but there are enough people in pursuit of the fast buck to keep poaching rings going.

Is the best (wildlife) defense a good (wildlife) offense?

Incentives make the world go round, so if there’s a goal or problem weighing on your heart, the first step is defining the game and who the players are. Great leaders understand this implicitly.

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